Hair Trigger Eternities

Playhouse Gallery, Overture Center for the Arts
Madison, WI
Summer, 2016

 
Looking for God and covering all that we can  2016 handmade cotton papers around pink foam board shape, suspended by hemp rope. lighting - and the Frans Kline shadow - courtesy of the Overture Center's Broadway-quality lighting people.

Looking for God and covering all that we can
2016 handmade cotton papers around pink foam board shape, suspended by hemp rope. lighting - and the Frans Kline shadow - courtesy of the Overture Center's Broadway-quality lighting people.

 

Hair-trigger Eternities was curated by the Overture's Beth Racette and up from June 27 to September 4, 2016. We showed alongside Caryn Ann Bendrick and Marissa Mackey. The title comes from a passage in Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer. "In this sort of hair-trigger eternity I felt that everything was justified, supremely justified . . . " That is the feeling we seek in our work.

We showed 4 works.

looking down from 2nd floor at Looking for God (lower piece) and How to speak reassuringly in always uncertain

The gallery is a long curving hallway with pink carpet that lots of theater-goers use. Fortunately, the hallway widens out and opens up to the second floor. It's tall and out of pedestrian traffic, so we could install 2 floor pieces.

No simple pedestal would do for How to speak. We wanted the paper covered form tilted just so; thus the base had to be tailored. While providing a surface contrast to the papered form, both sculpture and pedestal share with uncertain times a rickety equilibrium.

The work stands taller than the adjacent 9' hallway so the viewer can’t see it complete until one gets fairly close much as one might approach closer to a speaker to hear every word.

view of How to speak reassuringly's pedestal

Installation view of our 4 pieces before being lit by the Overture's lighting guys.

Installation view of our 4 pieces before being lit by the Overture's lighting guys.

3 of our pieces began as shapes cut from pink insulation foam board that we had scattered about the floor, rearranged again and again. We pinned together arrangements with skewers and hot-glued them. Then we covered these foam forms in handmade papers.

The resultant forms certainly looked like sculpture, ready to be frozen in place atop a bland and boxy pedestal. At the same time, they seemed meant to be interacting with something. Instead of showing sculptural specimens, we wanted to show objects doing, balancing, hanging. Their installation provides a context and is very much part of the piece.

The gallery below has some installation shots followed by some studio "in process" shots including a few alternate "takes." 

Out on a Limb with building blocks, the red, white and blue covered foam (below), took a couple of weeks to build and refine. Then we spent 3 months figuring out how to install it. The first image is what we settled on.

LandesSullivan at gmail.com