We’re working on a show at the Phipps Center for the Arts in Hudson, WI. It opens Oct 26, 2018 and runs through Nov. We hope to show 14 to 16 works including 5 larger works like the one below right (5’ x 5’ x 2'). We’re thinking of having the works flood the wall, floor to ceiling, just as some of the smaller works do in the bottom image.

Donald Lipski showed his pocket sculptures that way, making them look like specimens or samples. We like that notion. In our case, we want to hang the pieces just tightly enough so that our collection of works just about starts to look like a single entity.

 View and detail of Lipski’s 1979 MoMA installation of his pocket sculptures.

View and detail of Lipski’s 1979 MoMA installation of his pocket sculptures.

We titled the show “I like them together like that . . . for now.” We create work from an inventory of paper objects we’ve made as well as other materials arted up to different degrees with a little paper, paint, carving or bending.

The objects all shuffled between different groups of objects from which the works for the show emerged. Most have been part of past “finished” works, and the objects that return to us when the show comes down will go into new works or reprise their roles in earlier works, as needed.

 inventory in the wings.

inventory in the wings.

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 Before the elements of the work at top came together, they were tried out in other groups.

Before the elements of the work at top came together, they were tried out in other groups.

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Above is an early rough cut of what it might look like to let the works spread floor to ceiling. We’ll use PhotoShop to get a clearer scheme before we try to hang.

We like that floor to ceiling turns the viewer’s vantage point into an interesting variable. From across the gallery, works seem to command equal consideration. As the viewer moves closer, some works high on the wall will stay aloof to close inspection. Works at eye level might seem more accessible as they occupy a more familiar spatial position. And works near the floor reveal to the viewer a top view to contrast to what one sees several paces away. To appreciate the low works well, the viewer must bend down or even drop to a crouch to accommodate a better look.

 Another large work we’re trying to figure out. We liked it Tuesday evening. Wednesday morning not so much. And so it goes. Does the pink foam piece on the upper right look like a tongue or an ear or does stay abstract?

Another large work we’re trying to figure out. We liked it Tuesday evening. Wednesday morning not so much. And so it goes. Does the pink foam piece on the upper right look like a tongue or an ear or does stay abstract?